Posts Tagged "mental health"

Honoring Mental Health Awareness Month: What Does the Future Look Like?

In 1949, Mental Health America led the way in establishing May as Mental Health Awareness Month. Since that time, mental health care has come a long way through a better understanding of behavioral health conditions, the development of corresponding evidence-based practices, and improved health care delivery.

However, we still have a ways to go.

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Remembering Daniel: A story told is a story never forgotten

He was one of the most honest people I had ever met. His face was honest; it betrayed every emotion. His voice was honest. He always told you exactly what he was thinking. His heart was honest.

He felt things more strongly than anyone I know. I loved him. I met him on the first day of 9th grade and was instantly smitten. He was always kind and jovial with me, despite my relatively uncool standing, to his relatively popular one.

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Practical steps to clinical excellence

What makes a great therapist? What are the characteristics of therapists who stand head and shoulders above their peers in delivering effective outcomes for individuals involved in therapy?

Researchers have focused on the following factors:

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Serious mental illness and cancer: Treatment outside the box

“On average, Americans with major mental illness die 14 to 32 years earlier than the general population.”

Every time I hear it, I’m alarmed. Contrary to popular belief, most people with serious mental illness do not die from suicide or violence. They die from the same conditions as those without serious mental illness – cancer, heart disease, diabetes.

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Stronger support for Americans who risk their lives for ours: Changes for veterans

Happy New Year, Veterans (and all of us who benefit from your selfless service on behalf of our country)!

Despite a year of political upheaval and angst in Washington, veterans can be pleased with the new administration’s Veterans Affairs (VA) policy direction that has earned significant bipartisan support.

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‘Did you hear about Frank?’

As I showed a hometown friend around my university’s library one November Sunday afternoon in my sophomore year, a classmate saw me and said, “Did you hear about Frank?”.

I had last seen my roommate on Friday afternoon when we both headed to our respective hometowns for the weekend. I returned to the campus on Sunday. Frank did not. He had died by suicide.

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From misdiagnosis to stability: A story of struggle, of hope

My story is really about one of my daughters.

To protect her privacy as I tell her story, I’ll call her Elizabeth. Elizabeth has had suicidal ideations from since she was about 12 to about 17. At 4 years old, she was misdiagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

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The 2017 NAMI National Convention: Behind the Booth

Within hours of being at the Washington Hilton, I knew I was in for a special experience.

As I began to set up Beacon’s booth at the 2017 National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Annual Convention, I couldn’t help but notice the hopeful faces all around me.

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Suicide’s common tale: ‘If only I had spoken with him’

I first met “Ted” when I was barely 18, both of us transients in a city of transients where superficial friendships were the common social norm.

Ted was about 10 years older, and although we never dated, we had maintained casual contact with each other. We never discussed our personal history or hopes for the future, but I had sensed a deep, quiet loneliness about him that meshed with my own.

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Dealing with LGBT consumers’ anxiety this LGBT Pride Month

Perhaps there’s a good reason it took me until late June, LGBT Pride Month, to write this blog.

The fact is, as a gay man in 2017, I don’t feel proud; I feel anxious. As both a clinician and a consumer of behavioral health services, I’m in a unique position to appreciate why LGBT folks are increasingly nervous today.

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