Stigma

Beacon’s ‘Triple Aim’: Camaraderie, advocacy, health

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) “Triple Aim” has become a household term for many in health care.

The phrase refers to improving the American health care system through a three-pronged framework: improve the patient care experience, improve populations’ health, and reduce the per capita cost of health care.

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And the diagnosis is . . .

It’s first grade and the assignment is to draw Three Blind Mice.

All the kids around me had cute pictures it seemed, but mine was a big blob, looking as though someone had thrown up. This is my first memory of feeling behind in school.

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Dealing with LGBT consumers’ anxiety this LGBT Pride Month

Perhaps there’s a good reason it took me until late June, LGBT Pride Month, to write this blog.

The fact is, as a gay man in 2017, I don’t feel proud; I feel anxious. As both a clinician and a consumer of behavioral health services, I’m in a unique position to appreciate why LGBT folks are increasingly nervous today.

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The Kennedy Forum Illinois: Collaboration to drive solutions

So often when we speak about mental illness and substance use disorders, we talk about numbers: the number of people who have died from overdoses; the number of people who take antidepressants; the cost of mental health to society at large.

However, at the Kennedy Forum Illinois in December, keynote speakers put a face and soul to addiction.

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The Yin and Yang of 2016: A Crisis Year Holds Promise

Almost a century has passed, but these words continue to ring true and speak to our current tragic opiate crisis.

This crisis has touched almost everyone I have met and has spared no demographic group. The silver lining in this cloudy sky is the mobilization and alignment of legislators, medical professionals, the public and the insurance industry on wiping out this epidemic. Fortunately, changes have occurred rapidly that foretell a positive direction.

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The Unexpected: Part of the Awesome Beacon Bike Ride

Being a part of the Awesome Beacon Bike Ride has been an incredible privilege, filled with many unexpected gifts.

I have lived in Florida for 17 years, but it was only when planning our routes and then actually pedaling down the road, that I discovered a treasure of scenic towns, spectacular views and parts of the state I did not know or appreciate.

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The “Awe” in the Awesome Beacon Bike Ride

Now that segments 16 and 17 of the ride have concluded, it is a pleasure to look back and consider the monumental task that was accomplished by the great many exceptional people involved in seeing this through.

The word “Awesome” describes it well in a variety of ways. I’ll admit that I was one of those among us who, at first, simply allowed those earliest Beacon bike ride emails to go right on by unnoticed.

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The Three Pillars of the Awesome Beacon Bike Ride

Camaraderie, Advocacy, Health. What an apt set of objectives, though truth be told, I hadn’t fully processed their meanings before the ride.

However, staring at those words on the back of someone’s jersey while pedaling down the road stimulated a number of thoughts. Over the course of two days and part of a third, I not only thought about those words, I had the opportunity to experience them.

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Beacon Peer’s Hard-Fought Lesson: Heal Thyself

As a Beacon Health Options Peer Support Specialist raising a child with multiple disabilities, I never fully grasped that recovery is an inside job – until I had to recover myself.

Many Beacon locations employ peers, people with lived experience of mental illness or substance use disorder, to empower the individuals we serve to live their lives to the fullest potential. We might help them to navigate the health care system, or to define their own paths to recovery.

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Coming Out vs. Coming of Age

As a young person, whenever I saw a “coming of age” movie like “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” or “The Breakfast Club” or even “Footloose,” I would become angry rather than entertained.

I never knew why. I now believe it was because, as a young, closeted gay person living with a newly divorced mother, nothing could have been more inconceivable than the idea I would one day “come of age” and live my own life.

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