Outcomes

Applied Behavioral Analysis: More With Less for Autism Treatment

With April as National Autism Awareness Month, it’s a good time to recalibrate where we are when it comes to the diagnosis and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

While there is much to celebrate, there is also a reminder for continued vigilance: children receiving Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) services achieve better outcomes with fewer hours of intervention, but its use is still well below the ASD prevalence rate.

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Addiction Treatment: Let’s Get Our Definitions Straight

Everyone seems to have a theory about addiction.

Some say it’s a character flaw. Just say no. Others say it’s a victimization. Society has done me wrong. Alcoholics Anonymous says it’s a spiritual emptiness. Find your version of God, and you will find your way. Then, there are neuroscientists who say it’s a chronic brain disease while others say it’s a chronic societal disease.

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2016: A Year of Promise in the Fight Against Opioid Addiction

When it comes to addressing opiate addiction, it’s all beginning to come together.

Within mere days of each other, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker signed a historic law holding great promise to curb the Commonwealth’s opioid epidemic; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new guidelines for prescribing opioids; and the U.S. Senate passed the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (CARA) by a near-unanimous vote.

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Addressing Depression Care Management in PCP Offices: Collaborative Care

If you have read Beacon Health Options’ white paper, “Integration,” you learned that more than half of all adults with major depressive disorder are already managed in primary care settings.

You also learned that most antidepressant medications are written by primary care physicians (PCPs). However, most concerning is that approximately 45 percent of those who complete suicide have seen their PCP within the past month.

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Addiction: It may not be us; it may be our cages

Our country’s “War on Drugs” began in 1971 with President Nixon’s declaration that drug use was “public enemy number one in the United States.”

In addition to drugs as a symbol of youthful rebellion and radicalization, America’s new home-turf war was fueled by a growing literature base supporting the biological theory of addiction. However, one of the most interesting experiments to emerge from that era challenged this biological view. It became known as “Rat Park.”

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News Flash: Mental Health Funding Gets Its Due

When it comes to government funding for mental health services, there’s good news and some bad news.

The good news is that the federal government is putting its money where its mouth is. President Obama recently announced that the administration is proposing for 2017 the expenditure of $500 million for a series of two-year mental health initiatives and $1.1 billion for new addiction treatment, prevention and recovery programs.

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Integration

Integration is a buzzword in mental health care, but what does it really mean?

Such a plethora of definitions leads to a lack of clarity about what activities need to take place, where, and by whom to really make a difference in improved health for people with mental illness.

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Shake It Up!

Disruptive Health Care Technology through Strategic Academic Partnerships

In 1982, the rock band “The Cars” had a #2 hit with “Shake It Up,” a quintessential pop tune about letting go of your conventional self and dancing all night. To some, 1982 may seem like a long time ago, but defying convention remains a pop-and-rock-music staple (think Taylor Swift’s “Shake it Off”). More recently, “shaking it up” has made its way into the formerly staid world of health care under the guise of “disruptive technology” (Carnegie Mellon University, 2015).

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New Year, New You

Jan. 1, 2016 — This is the day I am going to: eat better, get fit, save money, drink less, quit smoking, stop looking at Facebook while at work, be nicer, stop cursing.

Pick your resolution, but if you’re like me, at least one of those resolutions is on your list. What is it about the new year that makes us believe that January 1 will be the day we turn over a new leaf and suddenly become the person we believe we should be?

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Time to Encourage Consumerism in Health Care

We don’t have to be experts to provide feedback.

I was doing some Google searching on the best way to find a doctor, trying to put myself in the shoes of a member who might be looking for services, and one of the articles that popped up struck such a chord that I had to put pen to paper.

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