Mental Health

Reduce Stigma and Improve Your Well-Being: It’s Just Like Riding a Bike

I started running when I was 8. This was right around the time that my parents divorced and my world changed in numerous ways.

I was having anxiety attacks and battling depression. I was having trouble concentrating at school. When I started running, I couldn’t tell you why I was doing it, I just felt compelled. When an anxiety attack surfaced, I put on my shoes and headed out the door.

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The £350 million per week question: What will Brexit really mean for mental health and the NHS?

On June 23, Britain, by way of public referendum and by a 52-48% margin, became the first member state to vote to leave the European Union (EU). Nobody had planned for this.

As a tiny amount of Brexit dust begins to settle, it remains to be seen exactly what this unprecedented decision will mean for the National Health Service (NHS) and mental health services in the United Kingdom.

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Why Minority Mental Health Awareness Month? A First-Person View

I know when some people see that July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, they may ask themselves why such a thing is even necessary.

Why talk about minorities specifically? Why can’t we focus on mental health issues generally? The answer is that mental health issues do not discriminate, but societal inputs can make identifying and treating mental health issues in minorities even more difficult than in the population at large.

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Play Golf, Take the Pledge, and Help Stamp Out Stigma

If you want to know what Beacon Health Options’ (Beacon) values look like in “the real world,” look no further than our fourth annual Stamp Out Stigma golf outing today in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Each year, Beacon employees tee up with a variety of community partners to support Stamp Out Stigma, an initiative to eradicate the stigma surrounding mental illness and substance use disorders.

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Asking the Right Questions About Gun Violence

In the wake of the recent nightclub shooting in Orlando, there are voices that are again loudly touting mental illness as a key target for preventing the repetition of such horrors.

Yet, as we wrote last year, researchers have already debunked the link between mental illness and gun violence. Instead, we found access to guns increases rates of suicide, but not of homicide. However, what most people don’t know is that, underlying all of this, there is policy prohibiting research from delving further into the issue and discovering where the evidence leads us.

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Zero Suicide: Aspirational or Reality?

It turns out that almost everything I was taught about suicide during my clinical training is not true.

Contrary to what most clinicians are taught, there is clinical protocol we can follow to prevent suicide attempts – apart from locking people up. Very little of this new knowledge about detecting and treating suicidality has translated into practice.

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PTSD: Not Just a “Veteran” Problem

It is frustrating as a retired Army infantry officer to see people assume that veterans, particularly combat vets, live with PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder). Most do not.

This perception is unfair to veterans, perpetuates a larger misunderstanding of PTSD, and diverts attention away from a larger population in need. Illustrating this problem, a combat vet recently told me about an ill-informed supervisor who replied, “I don’t need you going all PTSD on them…”

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Solving the Riddle of Schizophrenia, Several Pieces at a Time

“A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma” was how Winston Churchill described Russia’s position at the outset of World War II.

A statement that still rings true about our understanding of schizophrenia after more than 100 hundred years of research. While hints have appeared from time to time – autoimmunity, brain connectivity, genetics, age of onset – they seem to elude a synthesis that could help us make sense of this devastating psychiatric disorder.

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Integration

Integration is a buzzword in mental health care, but what does it really mean?

Such a plethora of definitions leads to a lack of clarity about what activities need to take place, where, and by whom to really make a difference in improved health for people with mental illness.

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New Year, New You

Jan. 1, 2016 — This is the day I am going to: eat better, get fit, save money, drink less, quit smoking, stop looking at Facebook while at work, be nicer, stop cursing.

Pick your resolution, but if you’re like me, at least one of those resolutions is on your list. What is it about the new year that makes us believe that January 1 will be the day we turn over a new leaf and suddenly become the person we believe we should be?

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